• 2021 HILT Conference

    The 2021 annual HILT Conference will explore how we teach students to become global agents of change. Our plenary session will consider how our collective experiences in remote teaching and learning allowed us to rethink our models of instruction, community building, and curriculum. Breakout sessions will explore the various ways instructors can equip students to confront ongoing world-wide challenges through active learning, collaborative groups, and engaged scholarship.
  • Instructional Moves

    IM spotlights reflective instructors from across the university using high-leverage teaching strategies applicable to multiple settings and grounded in teaching and learning research. Moves are anchored in videos that combine class footage with reflections from instructors and students, and these videos are supplemented by relevant research on the move’s efficacy, tips for enacting this move in diverse settings, and related resources that facilitate deeper exploration.
  • Usable Knowledge

    A digital publication based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education produced for educators everywhere. Usable Knowledge was founded to connect research to practice. They make education research and well-vetted strategies accessible to a wide audience: teachers and principals, district leaders, policymakers, university faculty and higher ed professionals, nonprofit leaders, entrepreneurs, members of the media, and parents.
  • Rubric Visualization Project

    Awardees will create a program to transform raw rubric data into an easy-to-understand visualization that shows which part of an assignment students best performed on and which parts they need help with.
  • Best models for blended learning between graduate students and professionals

    Awardees will test a series of blended learning modules designed to facilitate collaborative learning between professional and graduate students to highlight best practices in using blended learning to allow collaborative, co-education between professionals and graduate students.
  • Applying human-centered design processes to build successful teams

    Bethanne Altringer, Senior Preceptor in Innovation and Design and Director of the Desirability Lab, uses personalized approaches to students’ learning in courses like The Innovator's Practice: Finding, Building and Leading Good Ideas with Others and Design Survivor: Experiential Lessons in Designing for Desirability, focusing on individual-level growth that leads to team effectiveness by grading both process and product.
  • Designing Your Course

    Course design resources from the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, including 1) Backward Design, 2) Functions of the Syllabus, 3) Formative ("low-stakes") vs. Summative ("high-stakes") Assessments, 4) Assignment Modalities, 5) Framing and Sequencing Assignments, and 6) Grading and Responding to Student Work.
  • The Science of Learning

    Key concepts in learning sciences from the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, including 1) How Memory Works, 2) Comprehending and Communicating Knowledge, 3) Metacognition and Motivation, and 4) Promoting Engagement.
  • A balancing act: Making established courses your own

    Karin Öberg, Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Astronomy, taught departmental introductory course Stellar and Planetary Astronomy in 2016 by building on established material and modifying the curriculum using student feedback and her own observational assessment.
  • Engaging students in a course postmortem dialogue

    Alfred Guzzetti, Osgood Hooker Professor of Visual Arts, dedicates the final session of VES 52R: Introduction to Non-Fiction Videomaking—where students spend the term creating one nonfiction film on a subject of their choosing—to a class-wide postmortem discussion about all course elements.
  • Nuanced assessments: More than the final grade

    Howell Jackson, James S. Reid Jr. Professor of Law, experiments with end-of-semester exams and writing assignments to create opportunities for meaningful, formative feedback through skills practice, reflection, and peer collaboration.
  • Setting up effective feedback loops: The role of assessment in course transformation

    Logan McCarty, Director of Physical Sciences Education, and Louis Deslauriers, Director of Science Teaching and Learning, adopted an active pedagogy for a large introductory physics course and saw significant gains in student learning and attitudes.
  • The hiccups, humility, and benefits of deciding to flip a course

    Margo Seltzer, Herchel Smith Professor of Computer Science, flipped part of her course, CS161, “Operating Systems."
  • Teachly: A research project

    Teachly was developed at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) to help faculty members teach more inclusively and effectively. The tool enables faculty to get to know their students and interact with them in a meaningful way through the robust data infrastructure.
  • Making “Inclass” into a campus-wide educational technology app store

    Awardee will scale the availability of the SEAS educational technology (edtech) app store across the University.
  • The Video Essay as a Learning Tool in Field Based Courses and Design Courses

    Awardees will explore the video essay as an integrative teaching tool in field-based and design-oriented courses.
  • Teaching Decision-Making through Experiential Learning and Personalized Practice Across Disciplines

    Awardees will study how decision-making is taught and assessed across disciplines and disseminate effective teaching methods.
  • Helping students and faculty to optimize preparation for the flipped classroom: using efficiency metrics

    Awardee will use efficiency metrics to study the best preparation methods for a flipped classroom.
  • How digital education transforms residential teaching: Systematic analysis of faculty attitudes and experiences creating MOOCs

    Awardees will synthesize instructors’ pedagogically relevant experiences and lessons learned making Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) and create a set of best practices.
  • Evaluating methods of teaching and assessing critical thinking: A mixed methods study of faculty and students across Harvard University

    Awardees will conduct a mixed methods study analyzing the teaching and learning of critical thinking skills at Harvard—the differences in approaches across Schools, and faculty and student perceptions of critical thinking instruction and assessment.
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