• PILOT: GenAI in Teaching & Learning Session 2

    The Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT) will pilot a Generative Artificial Intelligence (GenAI) in Teaching and Learning Affinity Group for Harvard affiliates who are seeking to attend small, regular meetings for sharing resources, success, and challenges around the integration of GenAI into teaching and learning. We will host two virtual sessions this summer […]

  • PILOT: GenAI in Teaching & Learning Session 1

    The Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT) will pilot a Generative Artificial Intelligence (GenAI) in Teaching and Learning Affinity Group for Harvard affiliates who are seeking to attend small, regular meetings for sharing resources, success, and challenges around the integration of GenAI into teaching and learning. We will host two virtual sessions this summer […]

  • Lessons Learned from HGSE’s One-Year Online Learning Fellows Initiative

    Hosted by the HILT Learning Design Affinity Group, co-chairs: Karina Lin-Murphy, Neil Patch, Gabe Abrams Monday, May 20th, 12:00pm to 1:00pm ET Online via Zoom (recorded) | Register via this link to receive the Zoom login Looking to enhance your school’s online learning services? This interactive panel session introduces a novel course design support model […]

  • Spring 2024 Harvard i-lab & HILT Faculty Seminar

    Spring 2024 Harvard i-lab & HILT Faculty Seminar: Project-based Learning / Learning-by-doing   The Harvard Innovation Labs (i-Labs) and the Harvard Initiative for Learning & Teaching (HILT) would like to invite all Harvard faculty to a seminar on Wednesday, April 10th from 3-4:30 pm at the i-Labs. Our goal is to convene instructors from across […]

  • Learning Spaces – Tour of One Brattle Square, DCE’s premier executive facility

    Join the Learning Spaces Affinity Group for a tour of One Brattle Square, DCE’s premier executive facility, on Thursday, March 21, 2024, from 9:30-11:00 am. During the tour, we will visit the new state-of-the-art Brattle Square Studio and a case study classroom. Representatives from the Emerging Technology Solutions and Media Support teams will explain how […]

  • Effective Learning Strategies: What Students Understand Versus What They Do

    A Journal Club led by the Research-Informed Teaching & Learning TLC Affinity Group Location: Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, 125 Mt Auburn Street, 3rd Floor Date: Thursday, December 7 Time: 3:30 – 4:30 pm ET Click here to register In recent decades, research has demonstrated that certain learning strategies—such as spacing, interleaving, pre-testing, and […]

  • 2023 HILT Conference

    The 2023 HILT Conference comes at a pivotal time when artificial intelligence (AI) is becoming increasingly discussed and experimented with in higher education. AI holds immense potential to enhance personalized learning experiences, automate administrative tasks, and provide data-driven insights to improve educational outcomes. However, its deployment also raises important questions and challenges. It is crucial to address concerns related to privacy, bias, transparency, disinformation, and the impact on human agency and social dynamics within educational settings. Together, we will explore how AI can be designed, implemented, and governed in a way that prioritizes human relationships and connection in education. By considering the ethical and social implications, as well as the affordances, we aim to shape a future where generative AI tools are used to empower learners, support educators, foster inclusivity, and promote a holistic approach to education.
  • Using podcasts to build foundational relationships between students

    Matthew Potts, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and the Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, teaches Introduction to Ministry Studies, a cohort introductory course designed for graduate students who intend to go into the interreligious ministry broadly. His course offers an introduction that spans a variety of religions and simultaneously cultivates a sense of community amongst students. While the course was traditionally conducted in a lecture format with some section discussions, Potts had to rethink the course’s structure completely when it shifted online amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. “I wanted to get people off screen,” he explains. Rather than sitting through a live lecture, students listened to podcasts of Potts and the teaching team conversing about the readings prior to each class. To ensure students would also engage with him directly, Potts also organized Oxford-style tutorials, with students meeting in groups of two or three and with a different member of the teaching team to discuss the course material. Students would write a one-page memo reflecting on the readings and present it to get the conversation going. “I wanted a place for students to come and continue the conversation and feel invested in what they had read or what they had listened to, but not in any burdensome way.”
  • Shifting STEM culture

    Robin Gottlieb, Professor of the Practice of Teaching Mathematics, aims to make mathematics accessible and exciting to all students in each of her courses. “When students come to Harvard, they have very different but set ideas of what happens in the classroom,” Gottlieb explains. “In many high school math classrooms, the dominant cultural norm is an ‘I do, you do, we do’ model. The teacher is expected to tell you what to do. One of my main objectives is to shift the culture of the classroom so that students become mathematical thinkers.” Gottlieb works alongside colleagues on the preceptor team to construct classrooms in which students actively participate in the development of ideas. Inspired by colleagues’ such as Eric Mazur’s active learning and John Asher Johnson’s Tao of TALC, Gottlieb has students spend more time working on problems together in groups at the blackboard, reflect actively on questions and lessons from daily problem sets, and co-build community norms around supportive teamwork. Through group work, Gottlieb has developed mathematics classrooms that are more welcoming, active, and empowering places of learning.
  • “Ethical Reasoning for Computer Scientists” with Jeff Behrends, James Mickens, and Trystan Goetze

    In a follow-on to HILT's 2021 Conference, we will learn how Embedded EthiCS meets the challenge of making ethical reasoning integral to computer science education. We'll explore how embedding philosophers directly into computer science courses helps students learn how to think through the ethical and social implications of their work. And we'll take a deeper dive into the nuts and bolts of the collaborative Teaching Lab.
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