Below is a catalog of all the Into Practice issues sorted by the publication date. To subscribe to Into Practice, please sign-up via our Mailing List page.

  • Identifying knowledge gaps through illustrations

    Identifying knowledge gaps through illustrations

    Dr. Carl Novina, Associate Professor of Medicine, and his co-instructor Shannon Turley, amended the traditional graduate seminar Critical Reading for Immunology to teach students comprehension and presentation skills essential to a career in biomedical science.

  • One person’s story as entry to complex historical issues

    One person’s story as entry to complex historical issues

    Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Professor of the History of Science, illustrates how combining nineteenth century documents with oral histories can help unpack complex current issues and disrupt certain assumptions on topics such as undocumented border crossings, addiction, and disease along our southern border.

  • The merits of an equal basis of ignorance

    The merits of an equal basis of ignorance

    Giovanni Parmigiani, Professor of Biostatistics, selects new scientific articles as well as opinion pieces for freshman seminar course FRSEMR 22H – My Genes and Cancer to discuss in-the-moment scientific discoveries in genetics research, and encourages students to also recommend topics of interest.

  • Working with local communities to engage with global issues

    Working with local communities to engage with global issues

    María Luisa Parra-Velasco, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures, requires her advanced Spanish language learners in Spanish 59: Spanish and the Community to complete four hours a week of engaged scholarship with local organizations as part of their language learning experience.

  • Cultivating the skill and the orientation to listen

    Cultivating the skill and the orientation to listen

    Joshua Margolis, James Dinan and Elizabeth Miller Professor of Business Administration, demands of himself intensive listening while teaching, and asks the same from students: “When I listen really carefully it allows me to push students hard and help them see what they have within themselves.”

  • A balancing act: Making established courses your own

    A balancing act: Making established courses your own

    Karin Öberg, Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Astronomy, taught departmental introductory course Stellar and Planetary Astronomy in 2016 by building on established material and modifying the curriculum using student feedback and her own observational assessment.

  • Engaging students in a course postmortem dialogue

    Engaging students in a course postmortem dialogue

    Alfred Guzzetti, Osgood Hooker Professor of Visual Arts, dedicates the final session of VES 52R: Introduction to Non-Fiction Videomaking—where students spend the term creating one nonfiction film on a subject of their choosing—to a class-wide postmortem discussion about all course elements.

  • Perspective-taking and humility training with medical case studies

    Perspective-taking and humility training with medical case studies

    Dr. Sadath Sayeed, Assistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, introduces issues of ethical reasoning in medicine (e.g., confidentiality, professional boundaries, conflicts of interest, informed consent) with hypothetical cases and vignettes.

  • Leveraging individual strengths in collaborative projects

    Leveraging individual strengths in collaborative projects

    Jie Li, Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, provides students with multiple opportunities to collaborate in General Education course AI 63 East Asian Cinema.

  • Difficult topics: Seeking and considering alternative viewpoints in the classroom

    Difficult topics: Seeking and considering alternative viewpoints in the classroom

    Meira Levinson, Professor of Education, develops case studies about difficult questions in educational ethics—for example, grade inflation, charter schools, and policies that disproportionately impact low-income students of color—for A203 Educational Justice students to debate and discuss the ethical dimensions of educational practice and policy.

  • Creative projects: Interpreting history through various media

    Creative projects: Interpreting history through various media

    Vincent Brown, Charles Warren Professor of American History and Professor of African and African American Studies, trains students to interpret history through various media including graphics, data visualizations, videos, and art installations.

  • Problems and puzzles: Boosting engagement with interactivity

    Problems and puzzles: Boosting engagement with interactivity

    Joshua Greene, Professor of Psychology, designs course sessions for maximum engagement by creating interactive opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to grapple with problems and challenge one another.

  • Student case pedagogy: Learning from their own experience

    Student case pedagogy: Learning from their own experience

    Ronald Heifetz, Co-Founder of the Center for Public Leadership and King Hussein bin Talal Senior Lecturer of Public Leadership, uses experiential teaching methods like student case analysis—where students collaboratively develop and analyze cases drawn from their own work experiences—to promote deeper engagement and stronger retention of leadership concepts.

  • Leveraging student heterogeneity to bridge gaps through active learning

    Leveraging student heterogeneity to bridge gaps through active learning

    Marianne Wessling-Resnick, Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry, employs active learning strategies including debate, ‘pair and share,’ and peer evaluation to bridge gaps in student experience and knowledge.

  • Nuanced assessments: More than the final grade

    Nuanced assessments: More than the final grade

    Howell Jackson, James S. Reid Jr. Professor of Law, experiments with end-of-semester exams and writing assignments to create opportunities for meaningful, formative feedback through skills practice, reflection, and peer collaboration.

  • A ‘tangible dimension:’ Learning by making, listening, and tasting

    A ‘tangible dimension:’ Learning by making, listening, and tasting

    Gojko Barjamovic, Lecturer on Assyriology, increases student learning in ANE 103 Ancient Lives by designing activities to engage students’ full range of senses.

  • Online engagement: Designing a learner-centered HarvardX course

    Online engagement: Designing a learner-centered HarvardX course

    Diane Moore, Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies and Education, collaborated with HDS and FAS colleagues to produce a six-module, online course offering through HarvardX called World Religions Through Their Scriptures.

  • From the source: Guest speakers in the classroom

    From the source: Guest speakers in the classroom

    David Garvin, C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration,utilizes guest speakers in General Management: Processes and Action in order to promote deeper understanding of managerial and organizational realities.

  • Engaging students via field trips, near and far

    Engaging students via field trips, near and far

    James Hanken, Professor of Biology and Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), increases student engagement by taking students out of the traditional classroom.

  • ‘Real-world’ projects: Balancing student learning and community need

    ‘Real-world’ projects: Balancing student learning and community need

    Ann Forsyth, Professor of Urban Planning, incorporates projects with clients into many of her Graduate School of Design courses, from semester-long endeavors to optional assignments.