Below is a catalog of all the Into Practice issues sorted by the publication date. To subscribe to Into Practice, please sign-up via our Mailing List page.

  • Real problems: Teaching theory through practice

    Real problems: Teaching theory through practice

    Jelani Nelson, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, assigns students real programming problems in his introductory algorithm courses, CS124Data Structures and Algorithms and CS125 Algorithms & Complexity.

  • The hidden curriculum: Engaging students on another level

    The hidden curriculum: Engaging students on another level

    Bernhard Nickel, Professor of Philosophy, engages students in his introductory College courses about the “hidden curriculum”—defined here as the social and disciplinary norms often invisible to both students and the teaching staff, including expectations about class preparation, in-session focus, respectful discussion behavior, and the role of feedback.

  • Museum collections: Using objects to teach the abstract

    Museum collections: Using objects to teach the abstract

    Racha Kirakosian, Assistant Professor of German and of Religion, selected works of art for an installation at the Harvard Art Museums for students in her freshman seminar, Guilty Until Proven Innocent: Finding Justice and Truth in the Middle Ages.

  • Late semester assignments: Recognizing merit through collaboration

    Late semester assignments: Recognizing merit through collaboration

    Lani Guinier, Bennett Boskey Professor of Law, incorporates collaboration into her late semester assignments in order to provide opportunities for self-improvement and self-reflection.

  • Blended Learning: Using interactive online modules before class to enhance learning in class

    Blended Learning: Using interactive online modules before class to enhance learning in class

    Dan Levy, Senior Lecturer in Public Policy and Faculty Chair of the Strengthening Learning and Teaching Excellence (SLATE) Initiative at the Harvard Kennedy School, developed a series of online modules for Advanced Quantitative Methods I, work made possible by teaching fellow Teddy Svoronos and SLATE staff member Mae Klinger.

  • Primary sources: Teaching humanity in history

    Primary sources: Teaching humanity in history

    Catherine Brekus, Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America, worked with Schlesinger Research Librarian Amanda Strauss this semester to design a session for her freshman seminar on Christianity and slavery: “When I arrived for our meeting, there was a table full of materials for me to look at—Amanda did so much work.”

  • Research assignments: Teaching the production of knowledge

    Research assignments: Teaching the production of knowledge

    Ryan Enos, Associate Professor of Government, assigns an original research project—students define a question, design a study, collect data, and present their results—in his undergraduate and graduate political science courses.

  • Multimedia assignments: A doable skill, a usable skill

    Multimedia assignments: A doable skill, a usable skill

    Shigehisa (Hisa) Kuriyama, Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History and Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, prefers brief video assignments – where students create a visual presentation with audio narrative – to regular written response papers. “I think the ability to express oneself with media is one of the most usable skills.”

  • Learning through literature: “Closer to life as it is really lived”

    Learning through literature: “Closer to life as it is really lived”

    Sandra Sucher, MBA Class of 1966 Professor of Management Practice, teaches “The Moral Leader” at Harvard Business School with a literature-based approach.

  • Setting up effective feedback loops: The role of assessment in course transformation

    Setting up effective feedback loops: The role of assessment in course transformation

    Logan McCarty, Director of Physical Sciences Education, and Louis Deslauriers, Director of Science Teaching and Learning, adopted an active pedagogy for a large introductory physics course and saw significant gains in student learning and attitudes.

  • Teacher/learner dependency: A classroom culture of reciprocity

    Teacher/learner dependency: A classroom culture of reciprocity

    Katherine K.  Merseth, Senior Lecturer on Education, creates a culture of reciprocity in her classroom where students and instructors are expected to both teach and learn.

  • Defining learning objectives: Pre-semester, all semester

    Defining learning objectives: Pre-semester, all semester

    José A. (Tony) Gómez-Ibáñez, Derek C. Bok Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy, who holds appointments at the GSD and HKS, defines the learning objectives of his course prior to the start of the semester and references them to frame each individual class session: “I use the first five minutes to place each class in the course – ‘The last class we talked about X and today we want to see how those ideas might apply to Y.’”

  • Putting students at the helm of their learning experience

    Putting students at the helm of their learning experience

    Jon Hanson, Alfred Smart Professor of Law, saw an opportunity to improve learning by putting students in the driver's seat.

  • Getting the most out of classroom space

    Getting the most out of classroom space

    Melissa Franklin, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics, rethought her teaching by rethinking her classroom. She created a flexible classroom, “the SciBox,” to encourage active learning, greater engagement, and student ownership.

  • Feedback vs. evaluation: Getting past the reluctance to deliver negative feedback

    Feedback vs. evaluation: Getting past the reluctance to deliver negative feedback

    When Dr. Keith Baker, Associate Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Anesthesia Residency Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, gives medical residents feedback, he emphasizes a “learning orientation” (where the goal is mastery), rather than a “performance orientation” (where the goal is validation of abilities).

  • Learning from learning management systems: New ways to engage students through Canvas

    Learning from learning management systems: New ways to engage students through Canvas

    Arthur Applbaum, Adams Professor of Democratic Values, Quinton Mayne, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, and Christopher Robichaud, Lecturer in Ethics and Public Policy piloted the new University-wide learning management system, Canvas, in their spring 2015 courses at the Harvard Kennedy School.

  • Elevating class conversation: Taking a case-based approach

    Elevating class conversation: Taking a case-based approach

    Nancy Kane, Professor of Management and Associate Dean of Case-based Teaching and Learning at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, trains instructors on using the teaching case to lead effective course discussions.

  • Devices in the classroom? Things to consider

    Devices in the classroom? Things to consider

    Alison Simmons, Samuel H. Wolcott Professor of Philosophy, made a decision in 2012 to include a policy in all her syllabi stating that electronic devices be put away during class time.

  • Communicating course culture: Building on the syllabus

    Communicating course culture: Building on the syllabus

    Karen Brennan, Assistant Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, designs her syllabus for T550: Designing for Learning by Creating to not only communicate the plan for the course, but to introduce students to the course culture.

  • The hiccups, humility, and benefits of deciding to flip a course

    The hiccups, humility, and benefits of deciding to flip a course

    Margo Seltzer, Herchel Smith Professor of Computer Science, flipped part of her course, CS161, “Operating Systems."