Into Practice, a biweekly communication distributed from the Office of the Vice Provost for Advances in Learning to active instructors during the academic year was inspired by a successful 2012 HILT grant project. The e-letter highlights the pedagogical practices of individual faculty members from across Schools and delivers timely, evidence-based teaching advice, contributing to and strengthening a University-wide community of practice around teaching.

Below is a catalog of all the Into Practice issues sorted by the publication date. To subscribe to Into Practice, please sign-up via our Mailing List page.

  • Student case pedagogy: Learning from their own experience

    Student case pedagogy: Learning from their own experience

    Ronald Heifetz, Co-Founder of the Center for Public Leadership and King Hussein bin Talal Senior Lecturer of Public Leadership, uses experiential teaching methods like student case analysis—where students collaboratively develop and analyze cases drawn from their own work experiences—to promote deeper engagement and stronger retention of leadership concepts.

  • Leveraging student heterogeneity to bridge gaps through active learning

    Leveraging student heterogeneity to bridge gaps through active learning

    Marianne Wessling-Resnick, Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry, employs active learning strategies including debate, ‘pair and share,’ and peer evaluation to bridge gaps in student experience and knowledge.

  • Nuanced assessments: More than the final grade

    Nuanced assessments: More than the final grade

    Howell Jackson, James S. Reid Jr. Professor of Law, experiments with end-of-semester exams and writing assignments to create opportunities for meaningful, formative feedback through skills practice, reflection, and peer collaboration.

  • A ‘tangible dimension:’ Learning by making, listening, and tasting

    A ‘tangible dimension:’ Learning by making, listening, and tasting

    Gojko Barjamovic, Lecturer on Assyriology, increases student learning in ANE 103 Ancient Lives by designing activities to engage students’ full range of senses.

  • Online engagement: Designing a learner-centered HarvardX course

    Online engagement: Designing a learner-centered HarvardX course

    Diane Moore, Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies and Education, collaborated with HDS and FAS colleagues to produce a six-module, online course offering through HarvardX called World Religions Through Their Scriptures.

  • From the source: Guest speakers in the classroom

    From the source: Guest speakers in the classroom

    David Garvin, C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration,utilizes guest speakers in General Management: Processes and Action in order to promote deeper understanding of managerial and organizational realities.

  • Engaging students via field trips, near and far

    Engaging students via field trips, near and far

    James Hanken, Professor of Biology and Director of the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), increases student engagement by taking students out of the traditional classroom.

  • ‘Real-world’ projects: Balancing student learning and community need

    ‘Real-world’ projects: Balancing student learning and community need

    Ann Forsyth, Professor of Urban Planning, incorporates projects with clients into many of her Graduate School of Design courses, from semester-long endeavors to optional assignments.

  • Real problems: Teaching theory through practice

    Real problems: Teaching theory through practice

    Jelani Nelson, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, assigns students real programming problems in his introductory algorithm courses, CS124Data Structures and Algorithms and CS125 Algorithms & Complexity.

  • The hidden curriculum: Engaging students on another level

    The hidden curriculum: Engaging students on another level

    Bernhard Nickel, Professor of Philosophy, engages students in his introductory College courses about the “hidden curriculum”—defined here as the social and disciplinary norms often invisible to both students and the teaching staff, including expectations about class preparation, in-session focus, respectful discussion behavior, and the role of feedback.

  • Museum collections: Using objects to teach the abstract

    Museum collections: Using objects to teach the abstract

    Racha Kirakosian, Assistant Professor of German and of Religion, selected works of art for an installation at the Harvard Art Museums for students in her freshman seminar, Guilty Until Proven Innocent: Finding Justice and Truth in the Middle Ages.

  • Late semester assignments: Recognizing merit through collaboration

    Late semester assignments: Recognizing merit through collaboration

    Lani Guinier, Bennett Boskey Professor of Law, incorporates collaboration into her late semester assignments in order to provide opportunities for self-improvement and self-reflection.

  • Blended Learning: Using interactive online modules before class to enhance learning in class

    Blended Learning: Using interactive online modules before class to enhance learning in class

    Dan Levy, Senior Lecturer in Public Policy and Faculty Chair of the Strengthening Learning and Teaching Excellence (SLATE) Initiative at the Harvard Kennedy School, developed a series of online modules for Advanced Quantitative Methods I, work made possible by teaching fellow Teddy Svoronos and SLATE staff member Mae Klinger.

  • Primary sources: Teaching humanity in history

    Primary sources: Teaching humanity in history

    Catherine Brekus, Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America, worked with Schlesinger Research Librarian Amanda Strauss this semester to design a session for her freshman seminar on Christianity and slavery: “When I arrived for our meeting, there was a table full of materials for me to look at—Amanda did so much work.”

  • Research assignments: Teaching the production of knowledge

    Research assignments: Teaching the production of knowledge

    Ryan Enos, Associate Professor of Government, assigns an original research project—students define a question, design a study, collect data, and present their results—in his undergraduate and graduate political science courses.

  • Multimedia assignments: A doable skill, a usable skill

    Multimedia assignments: A doable skill, a usable skill

    Shigehisa (Hisa) Kuriyama, Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History and Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, prefers brief video assignments – where students create a visual presentation with audio narrative – to regular written response papers. “I think the ability to express oneself with media is one of the most usable skills.”

  • Learning through literature: “Closer to life as it is really lived”

    Learning through literature: “Closer to life as it is really lived”

    Sandra Sucher, MBA Class of 1966 Professor of Management Practice, teaches “The Moral Leader” at Harvard Business School with a literature-based approach.

  • Setting up effective feedback loops: The role of assessment in course transformation

    Setting up effective feedback loops: The role of assessment in course transformation

    Logan McCarty, Director of Physical Sciences Education, and Louis Deslauriers, Director of Science Teaching and Learning, adopted an active pedagogy for a large introductory physics course and saw significant gains in student learning and attitudes.

  • Teacher/learner dependency: A classroom culture of reciprocity

    Teacher/learner dependency: A classroom culture of reciprocity

    Katherine K.  Merseth, Senior Lecturer on Education, creates a culture of reciprocity in her classroom where students and instructors are expected to both teach and learn.

  • Defining learning objectives: Pre-semester, all semester

    Defining learning objectives: Pre-semester, all semester

    José A. (Tony) Gómez-Ibáñez, Derek C. Bok Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy, who holds appointments at the GSD and HKS, defines the learning objectives of his course prior to the start of the semester and references them to frame each individual class session: “I use the first five minutes to place each class in the course – ‘The last class we talked about X and today we want to see how those ideas might apply to Y.’”