• “I Learn Best When” | Centering Student Voices

    A panel of students from various Harvard Schools will share their experiences as learners. Through the lens of inclusivity and equity, what approaches have they seen work well? What advice do they have for when models or structures don't work so well? The panel will be co-moderated by Sherri Charleston, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer (ODIB), and Alta Mauro, Associate Dean of Students for Inclusion and Belonging (Harvard College). All Harvard students are welcome to join the conversation. All Harvard faculty and staff are welcome to attend, learn from our students, and ask questions.
  • The importance of incorporating mentorship into your teaching practice

    Dr. Anita Vanka, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Associate Advisor & Director of Hinton Society at Harvard Medical School, co-directs Practice of Medicine with Dr. Katherine Johnston, Assistant Professor of Medicine. The eleven-month course involves several hundred faculty members at different teaching hospitals and is designed to teach first-year medical and dental students how to effectively interview and communicate with patients, perform a thorough physical exam, reason through diagnostic possibilities, and translate findings effectively in both oral and written form. Given the size and breadth of the course, Drs. Vanka and Johnston developed a mentoring system which allows for each student to meet with an assigned faculty advisor at their hospital site several times a year. These meetings encourage faculty to develop personal relationships with the students, oversee their clinical progress, provide feedback, and guide students into setting goals for their learning and progress.
  • Grappling with a global pandemic in class, as a class

    Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor of International Law, adapted his digital governance course to incorporate what everyone was really focused on in mid-spring of 2020: the COVID-19 pandemic. Instead of “compartmentalizing” between class and crisis, he reworked the syllabus to respond to students’ needs and evolving experiences. Zittrain replaced the final exam with collaborative reports in which students examined aspects of the pandemic through the lens of digital governance dilemmas. “The idea was to offer students an opportunity to apply what they learned in the course to problems that were on everybody’s mind.”
  • Teach, embody, and model deep listening and reflection

    Cheryl Giles, Francis Greenwood Peabody Senior Lecturer in Pastoral Care and Counseling, shares her own experiences, missteps, and successes to demonstrate self-awareness for students in her course Counseling for Wellness and Resilience: Fostering Relational Wisdom. She encourages students to listen deeply to themselves and others without judgment by practicing mindfulness throughout the course.
  • Aman

    This project aims to tackle hatred and bigotry in India and Pakistan through developing curriculum, guidelines and training for teachers.
  • One person’s story as entry to complex historical issues

    Gabriela Soto Laveaga, Professor of the History of Science, illustrates how combining nineteenth century documents with oral histories can help unpack complex current issues and disrupt certain assumptions on topics such as undocumented border crossings, addiction, and disease along our southern border.
  • Working with local communities to engage with global issues

    María Luisa Parra-Velasco, Senior Preceptor in Romance Languages and Literatures, requires her advanced Spanish language learners in Spanish 59: Spanish and the Community to complete four hours a week of engaged scholarship with local organizations as part of their language learning experience.
  • Perspective-taking and humility training with medical case studies

    Dr. Sadath Sayeed, Assistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, introduces issues of ethical reasoning in medicine (e.g., confidentiality, professional boundaries, conflicts of interest, informed consent) with hypothetical cases and vignettes.
  • Student case pedagogy: Learning from their own experience

    Ronald Heifetz, Co-Founder of the Center for Public Leadership and King Hussein bin Talal Senior Lecturer of Public Leadership, uses experiential teaching methods like student case analysis—where students collaboratively develop and analyze cases drawn from their own work experiences—to promote deeper engagement and stronger retention of leadership concepts.
  • From the source: Guest speakers in the classroom

    David Garvin, C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration,utilizes guest speakers in General Management: Processes and Action in order to promote deeper understanding of managerial and organizational realities.
  • Teachly: A research project

    Teachly was developed at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) to help faculty members teach more inclusively and effectively. The tool enables faculty to get to know their students and interact with them in a meaningful way through the robust data infrastructure.
  • Whiteness: An Ethnographic Question

    Awardee will use an ethnographic lens to spark an interdisciplinary and intergenerational conversation on the role of whiteness in research, pedagogy, and institutional life.
  • Teaching Decision-Making through Experiential Learning and Personalized Practice Across Disciplines

    Awardees will study how decision-making is taught and assessed across disciplines and disseminate effective teaching methods.
  • Virtual reality narratives in foreign language pedagogy

    Awardees will engage foreign language students in cultural and linguistic immersion through virtual reality (VR) film narratives.
  • Choice architecture: When students become designers of optimal decision processes

    Awardee will develop in-class and online activities to improve student decision-making and increase classroom engagement.
  • The Diversity Journal Club

    Awardee will pilot a Diversity Journal Club (DJC) to understand how diversity issues impact learning, teaching, research, and culture in the science community.
  • Elective in primary care medicine and teaching

    Awardees will pilot an advanced elective in primary care medicine and teaching, where senior medical students tutor junior medical students in clinical skills, with assessment of its benefits to both students enrolled in the elective and the junior students they tutor.
  • LINK: Preparing students to evaluate evidence and navigate real world issues

    Awardees will refine six skill-building exercises intended to help students more effectively interpret evidence, and disseminate them to the Harvard teaching community.
  • Leadership and authority in groups: An innovative and experiential leadership development collaboration

    Awardees plan to design multidisciplinary workshops that use experiential learning to teach participants about group dynamics and leadership.
  • Harvard students and incarcerated students: Learning together in a prison classroom

    Awardees plan to develop a joint experiential-learning course for incarcerated students and Harvard students.