• How to improve the learning experience in core clerkships at Harvard Medical School?

    The project focuses on medical students' core clerkship experiences.
  • New Teachers Thriving

    New Teachers Thriving seeks to train new teachers to achieve personal well-being, enabling them work better with students and leave the profession at a lower rate.
  • MythOS

    MythOS is addressing the growing gap in social and emotional skills among adolescents who are not being served by traditional social activities (sports, theater, etc.) but are instead consumed by digital entertainment. MythOS is using games that resonate with digitally-focused adolescents to drive home social and emotional skills.
  • Data Coach for Teachers

    Awardees project seeks to address this problem through an easy-to-understand and free website or software that educators could use to (a) consolidate their data, (b) analyze their data, and (c) move quickly from analysis to action-planning.
  • myDev

    To tackle the problem of millennial employee turnover, awardees are working on a web-based application that focuses on professional learning development through monthly one-on-one conversations between an employee and their manager.
  • Arts in a Circle

    Awardee wants to design an affordable one-stop art education online platform for Chinese families. They plan to educate the public about the broad definition of art education and design a series of online courses for families with children aged 5-12.
  • Usmosis

    Usmosis solves weak student engagement for distant learning communities creating connectivity through sincere peer engagement and virtual worlds.
  • Grow.Us

     Through training in soft and hard skills, awardees prepare students to work on projects in a summer internship.
  • STEMFinder

    The lack of students moving from an interest in STEM to a STEM career is problematic. Awardees plan to curate the best free STEM learning resources for students (videos, tutorials, MOOCS, documentaries, career profiles) in one place, and connect them in a way that encourages exploration. 
  • S.A.F.E. – Share. Access. Flourish. Engage

    Teachers serving preschoolers in low-income and marginalized communities across the world, are struggling with issues that are affecting their ability to do their work. SAFE will be an online and mobile application platform that will give teachers access to developmentally appropriate resources to provide solutions to problems facing in their classroom, access to professional development opportunities, and the opportunity to form sub-groups of educators or educator communities connected by a similar challenge or a shared interest.
  • KidCollab

    KidCollab attempts to aid students and teachers in dealing with collaborative projects in the classroom. They envision that this experience will take the form of a “quest,” in which students will work together to solve a problem.
  • Simple examples lead to deep engagement

    Three years ago, Scot T. Martin decided to “start from scratch” with his approach to teaching thermodynamics. He found that by focusing on every day, concrete examples (e.g., running, the function of the heart) he could help students rediscover and truly understand the fundamental laws.
  • Balance of agency and flexibility helps students develop their own artistic process

    Nora Schultz, Assistant Professor of Visual and Environmental Studies, encourages experimentation and a diversity of readings for her courses Shape Shifting Your Reality and Object Matter of Jelly Fish: Sculpture Course.
  • Giving students practice with constructive criticism

    Mark Mulligan, Associate Professor in Practice of Architecture, requires students in Tectonics Lab to work collaboratively on design-build projects of increasing complexity over the course of the semester that are subject to critique by peers, guest experts, and Mulligan himself.
  • Inviting guest instructors to teach entrepreneurial theory and practice

    Jacob K. Olupona, Professor of African and African American Studies andProfessor of African Religious Traditions, collaborated with students from Harvard Graduate School of Education in 2013 to develop a team-taught course on entrepreneurship that would appeal to learners across the University.
  • Interactive lecturing: High-leverage teaching practices to energize students

    Paola Arlotta, Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, creates an environment of active inquiry, experimentation, and brainstorming by employing interactive lecturing in her course, Got (New) Brain? The Evolution of Brain Regeneration.
  • Hearing their own voice: Consistent student participation while discussing polarizing topics

    Elizabeth Papp Kamali, Assistant Professor of Law, wants to ensure that students contribute consistently throughout the semester: "A student can get into a rut if they don't participate in those first few classes, and it can be very difficult to break that cycle."
  • Applying the science of behavior change to lesson planning

    Todd Rogers, Professor of Public Policy, teaches students in MLD304 The Science of Behavior Change to leverage insights about human decision making and develop interventions through carefully constructed class activities and facilitated discussion, such as randomized experiments and think-pair-share brainstorms, respectively.
  • Encouraging students to engage with one another to solve problems (and problem sets)

    Cassandra G. Extavour, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and of Molecular and Cellular Biology, is one of six co-instructors for LIFESCI 50(A & B) Integrated Science, an intensive two-semester course created by Andrew Murray, Herschel Smith Professor of Molecular Genetics, covering methods and concepts from biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics.
  • Classroom norms: Develop a language of public agreement to eliminate “noise”

    Emily Click, Assistant Dean for Ministry Studies, Director of Field Education,and Lecturer on Ministry Studies, facilitates a discussion with students early in the semester to agree upon norms for classroom engagement, including how to address any divergent behavior.